A Spirit of Sloth and Slumber Possesses the Unsanctified

But I find by sad experience that such a spirit of sloth and slumber possesses the unsanctified that, though they are convinced that they are yet unconverted, often they carelessly sit still. Through the love of sensual pleasure—or the hurry of worldly business—or the noise and clamor of earthly cares and lusts and affections—the voice of conscience is drowned, and men go no farther than some faint wishes and general purposes of repenting and amending. ~ A Sure Guide to Heaven by Joseph Alleine

A Broken Heart Esteemed By God, But Not the World

‘The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and a contrite heart, O God, thou wilt not despise.’ But note by the way, that this broken, this broken and contrite heart, is thus excellent only to God: ‘O God, ‘ saith he, ‘THOU wilt not despise it.’ By which is implied, the world have not this esteem or respect for such a heart, or for one that is of a broken and a contrite spirit.  ~ The Acceptable Sacrifice by John Bunyan (pg. 3)

Sensing God’s Wrath Due to Our Sin

As a man that has by his folly procured a broken leg or arm, is heartily sorry that ever he was so foolish as to be engaged in such foolish ways of idleness and vanity; so he whose heart is broken with a sense of God’s wrath due to his sin, hath deep sorrow in his soul, and is greatly repentant that ever he should be such a fool, as by rebellious doings to bring himself and his soul to so much sharp affliction. Hence, while others are sporting themselves in vanity, such a one doth call his sin his greatest folly. ‘My wounds stink, and are corrupt, ‘ saith David, ‘because of my foolishness.’ And again, ‘O God, thou knowest my foolishness, and my sins are not hid from thee’ (Psa 38:5, 69:5). ~ The Acceptable Sacrifice by John Bunyan

What Does it Mean to have a Broken Heart?

This, then, it is to have the heart broken; namely, to have it lamed, disabled, and taken off by sense of God’s wrath due to sin, from that course of life it formerly was conversant in; and to show that this work is no fancy, nor done but with great trouble to the soul, it is compared to the putting the bones out of joint, the breaking of the bones, the burning of the bones with fire, or as the taking the natural moisture from the bones, the vexing of the bones, &c. (Psa 23:14; Jer 20:9; Lam 1:13; Psa 6:2; Prov 17:22). All which are expressions adorned with such similitudes, as do undeniably declare that to sense and feeling a broken heart is a grievous thing. ~ The Acceptable Sacrifice by John Bunyan

Few are Sorry for the Defects Sin makes in Our Nature

Many are sorry for actual transgressions, because they do oft bring them to shame before men; but few are sorry for the defects that sin has made in nature, because they see not those defects themselves. A man cannot be sorry for the sinful defects of nature, till he sees they have rendered him contemptible to God; nor is it any thing but a sight of God that can make him truly see what he is, and so be heartily sorry for being so. ~ The Acceptable Sacrifice by John Bunyan

Healing for Hypocrisy

Christian, if you mourn for hypocrisy, yet find this sin so potent that you cannot get the mastery of it, go to Christ. Beg of him that He would exercise His kingly office in your soul, that He would subdue this sin, and put it under the yoke. Beg of Christ to exercise His spiritual surgery upon you. Desire Him to lance your heart and cut out the rotten flesh, and that He would apply the medicine of His blood to heal you of your hypocrisy. “The Godly Man’s Picture” pg. 19

Shall I Sin Against Goodness

The goodness of God works for good to the godly. God’s goodness is a means to make us good. ” The goodness of God leadeth to repentance ” (Rom. ii. 4). The goodness of God is a spiritual sunbeam to melt the heart into tears. Oh, says the soul, has God been so good to me? Has He reprieved me so long from hell, and shall I grieve His Spirit any more? Shall I sin against goodness? The goodness of God works for good, as it ushers in all blessings. The favours we receive, are the silver streams which flow from the fountain of God’s goodness. “All Things for Good

Confession must be Voluntary

Confession must be voluntary. It must come as water out of a spring, freely. The confession of the wicked is extorted, like the confession of a man upon a rack. When a spark of God’s wrath flies into their conscience, or they are in fear of death, then they will fall to their confessions. Balaam, when he saw the angels’ naked sword, could say, ‘I have sinned’ (Numb. 22:34). But true confession drops from the lips as myrrh from the tree or honey from the comb, freely. ‘I have sinned against heaven, and before thee’ (Luke 15:18): the prodigal charged himself with sin before his father charged him with it. “Doctrine of Repentance” pg. 29

The Hypocrite Confesses Sin but Loves It

Our hearts must go along with our confessions. The hypocrite confesses sin but loves it, like a thief who confesses to stolen goods, yet loves stealing. How many confess pride and covetousness with their lips but roll them as honey under their tongue. “Doctrine of Repentance” pg. 29

A Hard Heart is a Receptacle for Satan

The justice of God, like the angel, stands with a drawn sword in its hand ready to strike, but sinners have not eyes as good as those of Balaam’s ass to see the sword. God smites on men’s backs, but they do not, as Ephraim did, smite upon their thigh (Jer. 31:19). It was a sad complaint the prophet took up: ‘thou hast stricken them, but they have not grieved’ (Jer. 5:3). That is surely reprobate silver which contracts hardness in the furnace. ‘In the time of his distress did he trespass yet more against the Lord: this is that king Ahaz’ (II Chron. 28:22). A hard heart is a receptacle for Satan. As God has two place He dwells in, heaven and a humble heart, so the devil has two places he dwells in, hell and a hard heart. It is not falling into water that drowns, but lying in it. It is not falling into sin that damns, but lying in it without repentance: ‘having their conscience seared with a hot iron’ (I Tim. 4:2). “Doctrine of Repentance”  pg 62